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  Home > History > 16th Century >

The Book of Howth: Elizabethan Conquest and the Old English
The Book of Howth: Elizabethan Conquest and the Old English


 
Our Price:39.00
Authors: Valerie McGowan-Doyle
Affiliation: Kent State University and John Carroll University
Publication Year: Hardback May 2011
Pages: 224
Size: 234 x 156mm

ISBN: 9781859184684
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Description
 

This study provides the first sustained address of The Book of Howth and its compiler, Christopher St. Lawrence, 7th baron Howth (ca. 1510-1589). The Book of Howth ultimately offers a unique and extended Old English perspective on colonial conflict, displacement and identity formation in response to the Tudor question of 'failed' conquest and the measures of reform government it generated.

This book addresses the evolution and impact of the Tudor re-conquest of Ireland on the Old English colonial community through a detailed study of The Book of Howth. Its compiler, the 7th baron Howth, an influential member of the Old English colonial aristocracy, has traditionally received only passing mention for his opposition to Sir Henry Sidney as lord deputy, for which he was imprisoned in 1577 and again in 1578, and for the charges of domestic abuse brought against him in 1579 for which he was imprisoned a third time. More careful attention to these episodes within the context of intensified measures of conquest and its attendant displacement of the Old English draws attention to the turbulence created within the Old English community prior to their more strident displays of opposition in the later Elizabethan and Stuart periods.

The Book of Howth, though long neglected as an erroneously-perceived work of uncertain authorship, dating, and worth, was in fact, as this study argues, compiled purposefully by Howth over the decade of the 1570s in response to this process. This study therefore reassesses Howth's text for its contribution to assessments of colonial practice, conflict and positioning in the later sixteenth century.

Contents

Introduction xiii

1. Contexts: Tudor conquest, the Old English and historical writing 1 2. Christopher St Lawrence, 7th Baron of Howth (c.151089) 11.3. Compiling Opposition: Manuscript construction and contents 38 Part 1: The Construction of The Book of Howth 39 Part 2: The Contents of The Book of Howth 52 4. Colonial Conflict and Positioning: Assessing The Book of Howth 87 5. Circulation of The Book of Howthand its Use 114 6. Conclusion: Tudor Imperialism and Old English Displacement 125 Appendix A:Lands held by Christopher St Lawrence, 7th Baron of Howth 133 Appendix B:Stages of Manuscript Construction 135 Appendix C:Select emendations to the Calendar of the Carew Manuscriptsedition of The Book of Howth 137 Bibliography 141 Notes and References 161 Index 199

Valerie McGowan-Doyle lectures in Irish and British history at Kent State University and John Carroll University


Average Rating: 4.5 of 5 Total Reviews: 2 Write a review »

  0 of 0 people found the following review helpful:
 
The Book of Howth September 30, 2013
Reviewer: Larissa Tracy from Longwood University, USA  
The Book of Howth is an important work for understanding the complexity of Old English identity in Tudor Ireland and its place within Elizabethan politics. It fills several gaps in the historical record and in recent scholarship about the conflicts between the diminishing Old English and the New English who sought to replace them in continued drive for request.

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  0 of 0 people found the following review helpful:
 
Written in the 1570 s by the seventh baron of Howt May 22, 2012
Reviewer: Noeleen Dowling The Irish Times May 19th 2012 from Republic of Ireland  
Written in the 1570 s by the seventh baron of Howth  Christopher St Lawrence  the text is an invaluable aid to anyone studying the effects of the growing power of the New English and their regime in Dublin Castle. St Lawrence had been a direct victim of this  spending months imprisoned in the castle for his part in the cess controversy. He was in good company: many of his peers among the Old English were there too. Inevitably  plots and counterplots ensued  and it would appear that St Lawrence was lucky to get out of the castle with his head still attached to his shoulders. He was later imprisoned for the most appalling domestic violence against his wife  his daughter and domestic servant  which suggest to the reader that St Lawrence may not have been completely sane. Be that as it may  St Lawrence has done historians everywhere a favour with his book  which contains probably the best description we have or are likely to get of our capital in the late 16th century. Valerie McGowan Doyle  a lecturer in Irish and British history at Kent State University and John Carroll University  has rendered the manuscript accessible to 21st century readers. Her book is handsome  fascinating and  above all  readable. It is to her that we owe our thanks for making St Lawrence s book academically respectable again.

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