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The Making of Irish Traditional Music
The Making of Irish Traditional Music


 
Our Price:39.00
Authors: Helen O'Shea
Affiliation: Honorary Research Fellow at the University of Melbourne, Australia
Publication Year: Hardback 2008
Pages: 230
Size: 234 x 156mm

ISBN: 9781859184363
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Description
 

The Making of Irish Traditional Music challenges the notion that Irish Traditional music expresses an essential Irish identity, arguing that it was an ideological construction of cultural nationalists in the nineteenth century, later commodified by the music and tourism industries. As a social process, musical performance is complicated by the varying experiences of musicians and listeners. The question of an Irish identity expressed musically is explored through an analysis of the experiences of both local and foreign musicians, including the author, in County Clare. It explores Irish traditional music's relationships with place and with gender. The conclusion that a radicalised ideal of national culture and an assimilative model of cultural contact are compatible has important implications for Irish society today.

CONTENTS

Introduction: Foreign Bodies in the River of Sound

Chapter One: When Smiling Eyes are Tearful: The making of Irish music

Chapter Two: The Morning Dew: Irish dance music's journey through the tradition

Chapter Three: Regional Styles: Locating a place in the Irish tradition

Chapter Four: Musical Pilgrims: Seeking authenticity in the west of Ireland

Chapter Five: Lovely Girls and Good Men: Woman and the fraternity of Irish music

Chapter Six: The Session: Idealising musical communities

Afterword: Music in the New Ireland


Average Rating: 5 of 5 Total Reviews: 4 Write a review »

  1 of 1 people found the following review helpful:
 
The Making of Irish Traditional Music August 21, 2014
Reviewer: David Lloyd, University of Southern California from USA  
The Making of Irish Traditional Music provides a valuable, theoretically informed cultural history of the retrieval and codification of Irish music in the context of an emergent Irish nationalism. It offers a valuable critique of notions of identity and authenticity at the very inner sanctum of an essential mode of Irish self-expression, but does so with considerable sensitivity to the pressures that draw people to adhere to notions of ethnic or national identity. The historical dimension of this work, from Bunting in the late eighteenth century and O'Neill in the late nineteenth to the emergence of independent state cultural institutions and their effect on the formation of 'traditional' and official versions of Irish music, is one of the very best continuous accounts available.

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  1 of 1 people found the following review helpful:
 
The Making of Irish Traditional Music August 21, 2014
Reviewer: Ann Spinney Boston College from USA  
This book is a welcome contextualization of Irish musical culture within European intellectual history since 1700. It is an exemplary ethnomusicological study, and musicologists will find O'Shea's arguments ring true; but it will be most valuable for established scholars in the cognate fields of Irish studies. This book has been written with great care for the sensibilities of Irish musicians and tradition-bearers...O'Shea's argument contains exemplary musical analyses that are aimed at a general audience and accomplished without using musicological jargon. This is one of the best books currently available on traditional Irish music

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  0 of 0 people found the following review helpful:
 
Many myths about Irish traditional fiddle music an August 20, 2014
Reviewer: Dolly Mackinnon Australasian J of Irish Studies from Republic of Ireland  
Many myths about Irish traditional fiddle music and the rural idle are  burst in the pages of this book as it becomes evident that the diaspora s  influences can alter the soundscape of Irish traditional music sounds within  Ireland. Nationalism  like nostalgia  is compelling and highly emotive  but  only up until the point where the nationalist mirage vanishes precisely  because it lacks substance  and cannot stand up to close scrutiny when  tested against the historical and sound recording evidence. All musicians  performing Irish traditional music need to talk about their traditions  its  actual past  its influences  its ongoing metamorphosis  its politicisation and  its transformation over time. Musicians need to hear O Shea s critique   however uncomfortable and confronting at times the  locals  may find it to  be. What is most impressive about parts of this book is O Shea s own  journey  and as she states  her  greatest reward as a scholar has been to  penetrate the thick skin of received knowledge about Ireland and Irish  traditional music  p. 4 . This she has certainly done in part  and it is now up  to others  musicians and cultural historians  to unflinchingly head off in the  myriad of directions she has pointed them towards to continue the quest to  unravel what makes and remakes Irish traditional music.

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  0 of 0 people found the following review helpful:
 
this informative thought provoking study is an exc July 22, 2009
Reviewer: CHOICE from Republic of Ireland  
this informative thought provoking study is an excellent addition to the existing literature on Irish music.

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