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Gold, Silver and Green: The Irish Olympic Journey 1896-1924
Our Price: €39.00
Gold, Silver and Green: The Irish Olympic Journey 1896-1924

Winner of the best book on the Olympic Movement and Olympic history for 2010. The award was made by the International Society of Olympic Historians

The book focuses on the Irish and Irish diasporal involvement in the Olympic Games. It discusses in detail the sporting involvement but, even more so, the political and national battles which accompanied the Irish Olympic journey prior to independence. It challenges our traditional perceptions of sporting nationalism and places the Irish story in a quite unique international context, showing how decisions made in London, Lausanne and New York had a profound impact on the Irish sporting, and national, destiny.

This book is the product of six years of research across Ireland, London, New York and Switzerland. It seeks to shed light on the half-known story of Irish involvement in the Olympic Games prior to independence. The research has unearthed a huge amount of information, most of it previously unpublished. Few people will have known that hurling and Gaelic football formed part of an Olympic Games, or that Ireland competed as a separate nation in events like bicycle polo and hockey long before independence.

The author traces the story of Irish and Irish American Olympic involvement from its accidental beginnings in 1896 through to the very significant political issues which dominated Irish sports, and our Olympic aspirations in the early 20th century. He has traced the role played by the Olympic Games in the evolution of a national identity in Ireland, and in the emergence of Irish America as a major sporting and political force in the USA. Political figures from Arthur Griffith, Roger Casement and John Devoy are all entwined in the Irish Olympic story.

The work highlights the divisions and complexities within Irish sport, as well as the significant influence of the British Olympic Association as a barrier to Irish recognition at the Games. It charts the political intrigue behind the scenes in London and Lausanne as Ireland sought Olympic recognition after the 1921 Treaty. Most of all, this work highlights the magnificent achievements of the sportsmen, and one woman, who originated in the main from rural Ireland and won substantial Olympic success in throwing and jumping events, the Marathon, tennis, and other events.


Gold, Silver and Green: The Irish Olympic Journey, 1896-1924
Our Price: €25.00
Gold, Silver and Green: The Irish Olympic Journey, 1896-1924

Winner of the best book on the Olympic Movement and Olympic history for 2010. The award was made by the International Society of Olympic Historians

The book focuses on the Irish and Irish diasporal involvement in the Olympic Games. It discusses in detail the sporting involvement but, even more so, the political and national battles which accompanied the Irish Olympic journey prior to independence. It challenges our traditional perceptions of sporting nationalism and places the Irish story in a quite unique international context, showing how decisions made in London, Lausanne and New York had a profound impact on the Irish sporting, and national, destiny.

Shortlisted for the Aberdare Literary Prize 2011 & International Society of Olympic Historians 2011

This book is the product of six years of research across Ireland, London, New York and Switzerland. It seeks to shed light on the half-known story of Irish involvement in the Olympic Games prior to independence. The research has unearthed a huge amount of information, most of it previously unpublished. Few people will have known that hurling and Gaelic football formed part of an Olympic Games, or that Ireland competed as a separate nation in events like bicycle polo and hockey long before independence.

The author traces the story of Irish and Irish American Olympic involvement from its accidental beginnings in 1896 through to the very significant political issues which dominated Irish sports, and our Olympic aspirations in the early 20th century. He has traced the role played by the Olympic Games in the evolution of a national identity in Ireland, and in the emergence of Irish America as a major sporting and political force in the USA. Political figures from Arthur Griffith, Roger Casement and John Devoy are all entwined in the Irish Olympic story. The work highlights the divisions and complexities within Irish sport, as well as the significant influence of the British Olympic Association as a barrier to Irish recognition at the Games. It charts the political intrigue behind the scenes in London and Lausanne as Ireland sought Olympic recognition after the 1921 Treaty. Most of all, this work highlights the magnificent achievements of the sportsmen, and one woman, who originated in the main from rural Ireland and won substantial Olympic success in throwing and jumping events, the Marathon, tennis, and other events.

Kevin McCarthy is Senior Inspector with Department of Education and Science and is the author of Footsteps in Time (CJ Fallon 1997), Concise History (CJ Fallon 1998), Cappoquin: A Walk through History (2000, with Melanie O'Sullivan

Irish Soccer Migrants: a Social and Cultural History
Our Price: €29.00
Irish Soccer Migrants: a Social and Cultural History
This book looks at the experiences and achievement levels of Irish-born football migrants to Britain and further afield. In particular, it draws on interviews with twenty-four Irish-born footballers, each of whom has played league football in England or Scotland in the 1945-2010 period. This is the first book to utilise these migrants as a quantitative source, and to illustrate their experiences within the context of the Irish diaspora. It builds on a comprehensive range of databases to examine players’ career movements and is illustrated throughout with tables and pictures.

It is the first full-length examination of the migration of Irish born footballers to Britain in the period from 1888 until 2010
It uses interviews with twenty-four Irish born footballers, each of whom have played league football in England or Scotland, utilising players from the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland on a decade by decade basis in the period from 1945 until 2010 as well as an extensive range of archival and other sources.
It is the first book to locate the study of Irish football migrants within the study of the Irish diaspora.

An examination of the birthplaces of players is offered along with the reasons for their geographical diversity. As well as providing an assessment of the development of schoolboy coaching structures in Ireland and the social challenges which many young players have faced, particularly in rural areas, it discusses key childhood influences and the development of scouting networks. It assesses the recruitment process and identifies the Irish clubs which have produced the most players who have migrated and played first team league football in Britain, and in turn, it establishes the clubs in Britain which have given first team league football to the most Irish-born players. The impact of the Troubles on the migration of Northern Ireland born players is also discussed. An assessment of players’ working conditions and the culture of professional football in Britain is given, particularly in light of the cultural adaption required, while the book also examines the changing nature of the post-playing careers of these footballers. The decline of Irish-born players within top flight English league football is discussed along with a number of difficulties facing future Irish football migrants. In locating the study of Irish football migrants within the study of Irish migration to Britain, Europe and the United States of America, and in comparing the experiences of Irish born footballers with those from other nations, this book is the first of its kind.

Dr Conor Curran works as a part-time lecturer in Irish history at Dublin City University’s Open Education and has taught sports history at the International Centre for Sports History and Culture at De Montfort University, Leicester. His Ph.D. thesis was published as The Development of Sport in Donegal, 1880-1935 by Cork University Press in 2015. In 2013 he became the first Irish person to be awarded a FIFA Havelange Research Scholarship. This examined Irish footballers’ migration to Britain in the post-war years.

Republic of Ireland Players
Internationals
Mick Meagan, Alfie Hale, Paddy Mulligan, Damien Richardson and Richie Sadlier
Championship/Former Second Division
Brian Mooney, Martin Russell, Seamus Kelly, Michael McHugh, Barry Prenderville and Shane Supple
League One
Dean Kelly and Denis Behan

Northern Ireland Players
Internationals
Hubert Barr, Billy Humphries, John McClelland and Alan Blayney
Former First Division
Gerry Burrell
Former Second Division
David Miskelly
Former Third Division
Seamus Heath
League Two/ Former Fourth Division
Michael Carville, Raymond Campbell and Brendan Bradley
Scottish First Division
Andy Waterworth
Four players interviewed had experience of both English and Scottish league football. These were Gerry Burrell, John McClelland, Barry Prenderville and Shane Supple.

   
 
 
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