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Can the Celtic Tiger Cross the Irish Border?
Can the Celtic Tiger Cross the Irish Border?
Our Price: €5.00

Two of Ireland's leading economists ask to what extent Northern Ireland can learn from the phenomenon of the 'Celtic Tiger' economy in the South.

One of the Republic's outstanding economists, John Bradley, and the prominent Unionist politician and economist, Esmond Birnie, debate to what extent Northern Ireland can learn from the phenomenon of the 'Celtic Tiger'. Professor Bradley asks what lessons the North can take from the success of the Republic's economic planning and whether it makes sense for the island to trade and seek investment as one unit in a globalise economy. Dr Brine asks if the low level of trade and economic interchange between the two Irish economies is really that abnormal in European terms, and whether a successfully co-ordinated island economy is possible in two separate political jurisdictions.

Divorce in Ireland: Who Should Bear the Cost?
Divorce in Ireland: Who Should Bear the Cost?
Our Price: €10.00

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The 1986 referendum to remove the ban on divorce was won on the financial interpretation of the issues surrounding the debate. It is not divorce but marital breakdown which results in financial hardship and poverty for those involved.

Discusses in detail the financial consequences of marital breakdown Gives an extensive account of policy options open to government to alleviate poverty Examines the inter-relationship between maintenance and social welfare payments.

In 1986 the proposal to remove the constitutional ban on divorce was rejected by over two thirds of those who voted in the referendum. One of the issues central to the debate was that the financial consequences of divorce meant poverty for women and children, and yet the debate was conducted in the absence of any detailed empirical evidence on the financial crises faced by separated spouses in Ireland. Unfounded assumptions were made about how Irish family law operates in practice, together with confused discussion about the role of social welfare payments.Divorce is once again on the national agenda, with the government's 1992 White Paper on Marital Breakdown proposing another referendum on the issue. However, the proposals fail to address the financial consequences of divorce in any detail. In this pamphlet the author argues that it is the separation of spouses, and not their divorce which often leads to financial crisis, and that the anti-divorce lobby is trading on simplistic and misleading slogans which ignore an ever-increasing problem. The current reality is that the constitutional ban on divorce does not protect Ireland from the problems of poverty after marriage breakdown.The financial consequences of marital breakdown demand a sophisticated and positive response from the state, and from an informed public.

Women and the New Reproductive Technologies in Ireland
Women and the New Reproductive Technologies in Ireland
Our Price: €10.00

New reproductive technology is now firmly established in Ireland. The author argues for public debate not only to examine the practical issues but also at a more philosophical level where the meanings and attitudes behind the technology are explored.

Examination of the new technologies available in Ireland. Provides a study of the attitudes of clergy and policy makers to the new technologies. Places the Irish situation within the context of the international debate.

New reproductive technology - the technique of the 'test-tube' baby - is now firmly established in Ireland. While the introduction of these new technologies caused intense public anxiety in other countries, they have slipped into place in Ireland without any public discussion. How is that new, highly sophisticated technological means of infertility control - technologies which dramatically alter the meaning and experience of human conception - have been so uncontroversial in a country where the question of fertility control has been so controversial and divisive?This pamphlet is the first examination of its kind into the technologies that are at present being applied in Ireland. It gives information on the techniques that are on offer, the procedures that are involved, the dangers, the costs, the successes, the control over the technology as well as examining the attitudes of the policy makers and the main churches towards the technology. Given the fact that it is women who are the exclusive bearers of children and the exclusive receivers of the technology of new reproduction, this book provides a feminist perspective. It places the Irish situation within the context of the international debate and argues that - far from new reproductive technology heralding a new era for women, a new strengthening of the concept of a woman's control over her reproductive functioning - women have much to be concerned about in the new developments. The author argues for public debate in which all the issues are made known, and suggests that this should not be pitched at a purely practical level - the 'use' to which some people may make of the technology - but should endeavour to examine the issue at a more philosophical level, where the meanings and the attitudes behind the technology are explored.

Henry Stratford Persse's Letters from Galway to America 1821-1823
Henry Stratford Persse's Letters from Galway to America 1821-1823
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The letters of Henry Stratford Persse, whose great-niece Augusta was to achieve literary celebrity as Lady Gregory of Coole Park, provide a striking account of Galway life, Irish misgovernment and American democracy by a lively and unconventional observer. Persse was a Customs official and distiller in the town of Galway, with three sons who had emigrated to Boston and thence to New York in 1821.

In a series of letters to his 'darling boys', Persse expressed his prescient distrust of the potato as a staple food, abhorrence of the sectarianism of many fellow-Protestants, dissatisfaction with economic exploitation in Ireland under the Union and admiration for liberty as practised in America. The editors skilfully reconstruct Persse's milieu in Galway, and also the dynamic development of New York and the Erie Canal in the era of Governor De Witt Clinton, with whom Persse corresponded. The publication of these unfamiliar letters is a major contribution to the history of Irish emigration, graphically depicting poverty and stagnation in the West of Ireland before the Great Famine.

James Pethica teaches English Literature at the University of Richmond, Virginia, and recently edited Lady Gregory's Diaries 1892-1902. James Roy's books include The Road Wet, the Wind Close: Celtic Ireland (1986) and Islands of Storm (1991).

Patriot Priest: A Life of Reverend James Coigly
Patriot Priest: A Life of Reverend James Coigly
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James Coigly, a Catholic priest from Armagh, was hanged for High Treason in June 1798. Despite his eloquent protestations of innocence in this posthumously published memoir, Coigly had been deeply involved with the United Irishmen since 1791. Having worked hard to unify Catholics and Dissenters in Ulster, Coigly became ever more extreme in his attempts to raise support for rebellion in France and among English radicals. His memoir illuminates the political and sectarian conflicts which engulfed Armagh and spawned the Orange Order in 1795. In the first modern edition of this unique document, Coigly's sometimes disingenuous account of his political career is set against the latest research on the evolution of the United Irish Conspiracy.
Daire Keogh lectures at St. Patrick's College, Drumcondra. His books include The Women of 1798 (Daire Keogh and Nicholas Furlong, Four Courts Press, 1998), and The Mighty Wave: The 1798 Rebellion in Wexford (edited by Daire Keogh and Nicholas Furlong, Four Courts Press, 1996)

Frank Henderson's Easter Rising: Recollections of a Dublin Volunteer
Frank Henderson's Easter Rising: Recollections of a Dublin Volunteer
Our Price: €10.00

The Dublin rebellion of 1916, bizarre, unpredictable and catastrophic in its outcome, continues to defy easy explanation despite eighty years of rhetoric, scholarship and reminiscence. How did the rebels develop the lofty ideals and sense of destiny which led them into a seemingly futile act of collective sacrifice? Though many participants wrote personal accounts of the Rising and its origins, surprisingly few have yet been released for publication. Frank Henderson, who became Commandant of the Second Battalion of Dublin's Irish Volunteers, was brought up in Fairview, an inner northside suburb. Both parents had imbibed Fenian sentiments in Manchester, although the Henderson line had Scottish, Protestant and even Orange antecedents.

In a family memoir originally in Irish, Frank Henderson reveals the influence of his parents and the Christian Brothers in moulding his militancy and pride in Irish culture. His second memoir relates the wartime growth of the Irish Volunteers, Henderson's contacts with leaders such as Pearse and De Valera, and his experiences in, on and beyond the General Post Office. Equally fascinating is his account of internment in Stafford and Frongoch.

The editor surveys Henderson's subsequent involvement in armed resistance against Britain and later the Irish Free State. The publication of these recollections will illuminate the mentality and outlook of the revolutionary generation..

Andrew Bryson's Ordeal: An Epilogue to the 1798 Rebellion
Andrew Bryson's Ordeal: An Epilogue to the 1798 Rebellion
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Provides access to important unpublished documents concerning major events in Irish history. Texts are faithfully edited to high standards by leading specialists. Each narrative is presented in context with a full introduction and notes.

Andrew Bryson was the son of a Presbyterian leaseholder and prominent United Irishman in Co. Down. Though rapidly promoted to 'colonel', he does not seem to have participated in the county's few skirmishes during the rising of 1798. After a few months in hiding, he was punished not by execution or transportation, but by compulsory enlistment in the regular army. In a long and reflective letter to his sister, written in 1801 after his escape to New York, Bryson provided a vivid chronicle of his enforced travels through Ireland and beyond. The chaotic state of the Irish jails, and the casual cruelty often displayed by jailers and yeomanry, is described in sometimes painful detail. Sustained by his idealism and native wit, Bryson survived the long march from Belfast to Waterford and the even more rigorous voyage to Martinique. The letter ends with an absorbing account of sadism, sickness and the Irish expatriate solidarity in that exotic Caribbean setting.

The editor reconstructs the fraternal and intellectual bonds which supported Ulster's United Irishmen, even after their dispersal across the globe. The publication of this forgotten manuscript is a major contribution to the bicentennial commemoration of Ireland's bloodiest rebellion.

Pádraig Ó Fathaigh's War of Independence, Recollections of a Galway Gaelic Leaguer
Pá¡draig Ó Fathaigh's War of Independence, Recollections of a Galway Gaelic Leaguer
Our Price: €10.00

Pádraig Ó Fathaigh (1879–1976) was a lifelong Gaelic Leaguer in Galway. Already an Irish volunteer before 1916, Ó Fathaigh was arrested on Easter Tuesday. He spent the next year undergoing penal servitude, the first of four terms of imprisonment between 1916 and 1920. When at liberty, he acted as an Intelligence Officer in South Galway and Mid–Clare. His hand-written recollections illuminate life 'on the run' and in prison, and will interest all students of the Irish Revolution and the Gaelic Revival.
Timothy G. McMahon lectures at the University of Wisconsin

Memoirs of Joseph Prost C.Ss.R: A Redemptorist Missionary in Ireland 1851-1854
Memoirs of Joseph Prost C.Ss.R: A Redemptorist Missionary in Ireland 1851-1854
Our Price: €10.00

The recollections of Joseph Prost, an Austrian priest who initiated the Redemptorist parish missionary campaign in Ireland in 1851, provide a fascinating chronicle of the devotional revolution by one of its most earnest organisers. Tireless and uncompromising in his determination to save souls and reinvigorate the Roman Catholic faith, Prost often came into conflict with the parish clergy and his Redemptorist brethren. Though writing from memory two decades after his departure from Ireland, Prost supplies a detailed account of religious practices and social mores just after the Great Famine in Limerick, Derry, Wexford and many other Irish towns. The text has been translated from the German and fully annotated, with an introductory essay on Prost's career and the development of the parish mission movement. The publication of this memoir is a major contribution to Irish religious and cultural history.

A Viceroy's Vindication? Sir Henry Sidney's Memoir of Service in Ireland, 1556-78
A Viceroy's Vindication: Sir Henry Sidney's Memoir of Service in Ireland, 1556-78
Our Price: €10.00

One of the earliest recorded political memoirs in English literature, richly detailing the life of a key figure in the Elizabethan conquest of Ireland.

Provides access to important unpublished documents concerning major events inIrish history. Texts are faithfully edited to high standards by leading specialists. Each narrative is presented in context with a full introduction and notes.

Three times Viceroy, Sir Henry Sidney was a key figure in the Elizabethan conquest of Ireland. Sidney's account of his public career in Ireland, written in the winter of 1582-3, is one of the earliest political memoirs in English literature. It is unique among early memoirs in its size, richness of detail, and apparent fidelity to the factual record.Composed in plain prose and consciously shorn of decoration and classical allusion, his narrative presents an individual with attitudes and preoccupations at odds with the zealous advocates of military conquest and religious oppression so often portrayed by historians. By exploring its emphasises, omissions and deviations from the recorded sequence of events, the editor's introduction reveals a surprisingly complex set of Elizabethan perceptions and prejudices about Ireland. This memoir, last edited for publication in the mid-nineteenth century, is an essential source for the study of the English in Ireland.

   
 
 
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