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  Webb’s an Irish Flora
Webb’s an Irish Flora


 
Our Price: €35.00
Authors: John Parnell and Tom Curtis illustrations by Elaine Cullen
Affiliation: Trinity College Dublin
Publication Year: Hardback, 8th Edn March 2012
Pages: 560
Size: 135 x 194mm

ISBN: 9781859184783
Qty:

Description
 

This handbook will provide the reader with a clear and reliable means of identifying those plants which grow wild in Ireland. This book is a comprehensive re-working of the classic and standard Flora of Ireland which was last published 16 years ago: this will be the eighth edition of that work. It has been brought fully up to date through incorporating the latest in botanical research and it reflects contemporary and modern approaches to plant classification based on recent advances in genetics.


Trees, shrubs and climbers in winter are now covered for the first time. Also included is a list of plants that have legal protection in Ireland. Webbs an Irish Flora is illustrated throughout with hand-coloured drawings.

This book is about the higher plants that grow wild and which are commonly naturalised or otherwise encountered in Ireland. It is designed to help you identify and provide you with background information on plant morphology, distribution and rarity and to educate all those interested in recognising the species of the flora of Ireland.

Previous editions of the book have been used by workers outside of the specific field of study of plant identification – such as environmental consultants, the general public, students, professional and amateur botanists etc. There is a genuine demand for a Flora whose subject matter refers explicitly to Ireland whilst placing that flora in a wider context. Furthermore, a concise flora of a discrete geographical area is of interest internationally to many professional and amateur botanists and gardeners. The book has, is and will be used in student training (it is used as a basic botanical text book in some Universities in Ireland) and on training courses for professionals wishing to improve their skills and for all those needing to improve their levels of botanical expertise.

John Parnell is Professor of Systematic Botany at Trinity College Dublin (TCD) and Dr. Tom Curtis is an Ecological Consultant and a Research Associate in Botany at TCD and an Adjunct Lecturer in Botany and Plant science, NUI Galway.

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Average Rating: 5 of 5 | Total Reviews: 4 Write a review »

  0 of 0 people found the following review helpful:
 
The world of botany is ever changing with the disc June 19, 2012
Reviewer: Joanne Denyer Irish Arts Review Summer 2012 from Republic of Ireland  
The world of botany is ever changing with the discovery of new species of plants and genetic data bringing insights into plant relationships. An Irish Flora has long been the standard text for Ireland for identifying native flowering plants  conifers  ferns and related plants. But the last edition  published in 1996  has been in need of updating for many years. One of the major changes in this eagerly awaited new edition is a thorough revision of the ordering of plant families to reflect recent advances in genetics. This is very welcome as it puts this regional flora into a global context. However  a big disappointment is that many widely accepted recent changes to species names and positioning of species within families have not been adopted. This type of standard flora uses keys and textual descriptions for identification and inevitably there is a steep learning curve for beginners to botany. On the other hand  those with little botanical training will appreciate the reduction in specialized terminology. Other changes that users of the new flora will find beneficial are a key to trees and shrubs in winter  inclusion of many new species  including some non native species   colour illustrations of key plant characters  a list of protected species and updated keys and text. For many botanists  floras are in daily use and it would be surprising if this new edition was received uncritically. For my part  the major disadvantage of this book as a field guide is the increase in size from 2cm to 5cm thick. This is partly due to additional text  but also from the unnecessary use of larger typeface and thicker paper. Families are not numbered at the top of each page and this makes it difficult to quickly find the correct page from the initial family key. Common names have been included somewhat randomly which means that there is no definitive list of cormnon names for Ireland. I therefore hope that the pub lishers will consider a  slightly revised  pocket field guide version of this invaluable book.

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This handbook will provide the student or keen ama May 16, 2012
Reviewer: Charlie Wilkins The Examiner May 12th 2012 from Republic of Ireland  
This handbook will provide the student or keen amateur with a clear and reliable means of identifying those plants which grow wild in Ireland. It is a comprehensive re working of the classic and standard Flora of Ireland and has been brought fully up to date through incorporating the latest in botanical research and reflects contemporary approaches to plant classification based on recent advances in genetics. This substantial tome is about the higher plants that grow wild and which are commonly naturalised or otherwise encountered in Ireland. It is designed to facilitate their identification and provide background information on their morphology  distribution and rarity and to educate all those interested in recognising the species of the flora of Ireland. Previous editions of the book have been used by workers outside of the specific field of study of plant identification  such as environmental consultants  the public  students  professional and amateur botanists  etc. There is a genuine demand for a Flora whose subject matter refers explicitly to Ireland whilst placing that flora in a wider context. Furthermore  a concise flora of a discreet geographical area is of interest internationally to many professional and amateur botanists and gardeners. The book is used in student training  it is a basic botanical text book in some Irish universities in Ireland  and for professionals and others wishing to improve their skills and botanical expertise. John Parnell is Professor of Systematic botany at Trinity College Dublin  TCD  and Dr. Tom Curtis is an Ecological Consultant and a Research Associate in Botany at TCD and Lecturer in Botany and Plant science  NUI Galway. An Irish Flora is published by Cork University Press.

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Generations of botanical students set off on field May 9, 2012
Reviewer: Tom Kennedy Science Spin 52 from Republic of Ireland  
Generations of botanical students set off on field trips equipped with handlenses and a copy of Webb s An Irish Flora. The step by step keys made it a handy  self learning guide to the wild flowers of Ireland  and it proved so durable that the book  first issued in the 1940s was reprinted through several editions. The Dundalk publishers must have been amazed at having such a long and sustained demand  but eventually the time came for a major revamp  a task that took over a decade to complete. While Webb s earlier editions were small enough to fit into a coat pocket  the 8th edition  from Cork publishing  is a 504 page brick of a book.     John Parnell and Tom Curtis have comprehensively revised and expanded the content  and Elaine Cullen s fine illustrations help in identification of species by showing points that would be difficult to describe in words.    Apart from being a welcome re working of a classic guide  the classification has been brought up to date. In Webb s day  taxonomists often had to take an educated guess at where specific plants should be placed in an evolutionary tree. More often right than wrong  biologists are now on surer ground thanks to genetic analysis. For this book  the authors adopted the latest phylogenetic arrangement  known as the APGIII scheme  which takes into account genetic relationships rather than superficial appearances. The 8th edition is in fact probably one of the first floras to have adopted this approach.    John Parnell is Professor of Systematic Botany at TCD  and Dr. Tom Curtis is an ecological consultant and a research associate in botany at TCD and he lectures on plant sciences at NUI Galway. Revising the original flora was a daunting task  but the authors are keen to explain that they were following a path laid down by Webb. David Webb  with his wild head of hair and blue jeans  was a colourful figure that was hard to miss  but  more significant was his impact on Irish botany. As the authors point out in their introduction  having his name on the title is a good way to acknowlege Webb s role in laying such good foundations that enabled them to produce this impressive Irish flora.

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David Webb 1912 94 dominated Irish botany for ha May 1, 2012
Reviewer: Dr. John Akeroyd Sherkin Comment 2012 from Republic of Ireland  
David Webb  1912 94  dominated Irish botany for half a century. One of his most enduring achievements was the concise An Irish Flora  originally a slim volume published during the early 1940s soon after polymath Webb switched from zoology to botany. This straighforward guide to Ireland s wild plants has long made botanical identification and basic data on Irish plants widely accessible. Retaining the spirit of its creator  this 8th edition is in the hands of a new generation of authors  who have expanded it for the 21st century  incorporating both recent molecular research and our increased knowledge of the Irish flora. Simple colour diagrams clearly show obscure botanical features and a glossary explains any terms. The text follows Webb s plain  no nonsense presentation  it is not aimed at the enthusiast   succinct descriptions  avoidance of most sub species or varieties  and healthy suspicion of alien plants apart from those that are well and widely naturalized. It keeps ecology and plant geography to a minimum  but does provide the necessary clear keys and descriptions that should enable anybody to identify any wild Irish plant with confidence.

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