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A Quiet Man Miscellany
A Quiet Man Miscellany
Our Price: €25.00

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John Ford's The Quiet Man (1952) is the most popular cinematic representation of Ireland, and one of Hollywood's classic romantic comedies. For some viewers and critics the film is a powerful evocation of romantic Ireland and the search for home. This book contains new and original information and photographs about the film The Quiet Man.

Des MacHale has found a range of unexpected new information about the film. The book opens with the letters of John Ford's secretary, Meta Sterne, giving authentic information and commentary about what went on behind the scenes on location in Ireland. There were many rumours of a sequel to The Quiet Man but they never came off. However, a belated sequel Only the Lonely starring Maureen O'Hara was produced in 1991 and it is described and analysed. The emergence of the screenplay of The Quiet Man is a long and complicated saga. The book examines the initial rejected screenplay by the Welsh novelist Richard Llewellyn which contained much of the inspiration for the final cut of the movie. The memoirs of Maureen Coyne—Cashman, who lives in Brooklyn, New York, are published here for the first time. She is one of the few surviving bit players and she describes her experiences on set with Wayne, O'Hara, and Ford. The last outstanding bit player with a speaking part and his film career is identified. Intensive research over the last 15 years has failed to uncover this character until now. The real-life incidents on which the ecumenical scenes in the film are based are discussed.

The final part of the book covers more recent events including the Quiet Man conference held in Galway in 2004 and the opening of Pat Cohan's bar in 2008 which featured in the film as a real bar..

The book will also contain dozens of previously unseen stills from the movie and many unseen photographs of locations and personalities.


The Quiet Man
The Quiet Man
Our Price: €10.00

John Ford's The Quiet Man (1952) is the most popular cinematic representation of Ireland, and one of Hollywood's classic romantic comedies. For some viewers and critics the film is a powerful evocation of romantic Ireland and the search for home; for others, it is a showcase for the worst stereotypes of stage-Irishry. Much of Irish cinema since the development of an indigenous film industry in the 1980s has set its face firmly against these mythic images of Ireland, but no film has yet attained the enduring appeal of The Quiet Man. In this radical reappraisal of Ford's Oscar-winning film, Luke Gibbons traces its development from Maurice Walsh's original story (1933) and argues that its romantic excesses are a symptom of much darker undercurrents in the literary text, and the displacement of trauma that often underlies nostalgia. Moreover, Gibbons ably demonstrates how the film, rather than indulging in escapism, actually questions its own romantic illusions and the dream of returning to an Irish paradise lost.

Luke Gibbons is Professor of English and Film, Television and Theatre, at the University of Notre Dame, Indiana. He is the author of Transformations in Irish Culture (Cork University Press, 1996), and co-author of Cinema and Ireland (Routledge, 1988).

The Irish Review Issue 32
The Irish Review Issue 32
Our Price: €16.00

Contents

Thinking in Public

Edward Said and the Cultural Intellectual at Century's End
JOE CLEARY
Culture and Democracy in Ireland
DAVID DWAN
Theology, Habermas and Corporate Worship
SIOBH́N GARRIGAN
Critical Contexts for the Irish Left
MICHAEL MCATEER
Wiles of the Wireless: Radio and Critical Discourse in Ireland
HARRY BROWNE
Crime and Justice: Willie Doherty and Chris Ofili
ALICE CORREIA

Review Articles

The Rich Confusion of Experience: Foster's Yeats
PATRICK CROTTY
The Legendary Robert Emmet and his Bicentennial Biographers
GUY BEINER

Poetry

New Poems
HARRY CLIFTON

Reviews
LEONTIA FLYNN
Matthew Campell (ed.): The Cambridge Companion to Contemporary Irish Poetry
CATRIONA CLUTTERBUCK
Kerry Hardie: The Sky Didn't Fall
D͍ÓG O'CONNELL
Luke Gibbons: The Quiet Man
Cheryl Herr: The Field
R͍ÓNA N͍ FHRIGHIL
Joe Steve Ó Neachtain: Scread Mhaidne
Micheál Ó Conghaíle,: Seachrán Jeaic Sheáin Johnny
IAN CAMPBELL ROSS
Thomas Keymer: Sterne, the Moderns, and the Novel
MOYRA HASLETT
Paul O'Brien: Shelley & Revolutionary Ireland
DIARMUID SCULLY
James Muldoon: Identity on the Medieval Irish Frontier: Degenerate Englishmen, Wild Irishmen, Middle Nations
MARGARET Ó hÓGARTAIGH
Janet Todd: Rebel Daughters. Ireland in Conflict, 1798
Alan Hayes and Diane Urquhart (eds): Irish Women's History
MICHAEL HOPKINSON
David Fitzpatrick: Harry Boland's Irish Revolution, 1887-1922
Marie Coleman: County Longford and the Irish Revolution, 1910-1923
DEIRDRE MCMAHON
J.R. Hill (ed.): A New History of Ireland: VII Ireland 1921-1984
Gabriel Doherty & Dermot Keogh (eds): De Valera's Irelands
KEVIN RAFTER
Richard English: Armed Struggle: The History of the IRA
CHRISTOPHER FARRINGTON
Richard Bourke: Peace in Ireland: The War of Ideas

Notes on Contributors

   
 
 
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