,
 
To receive your discount code please enter your email below






Shop by Price
Free Shipping
featured products
products

  Home > Sport >

The Irish Soccer Split
Irish Soccer Split


 
Our Price:25.00
Authors: Cormac Moore
Affiliation: De Montfort University
Publication Year: Hardback September 2015
Pages: 332
Size: 234 x 156 mm

ISBN: 9781782051527
Qty:

Description
 
The Irish Football Association (IFA) was founded in Belfast in 1880. It was the governing body for soccer for the whole of the island of Ireland. Soccer in Ireland was united for over forty years. It was, though, an uneasy alliance. Many in the south believed that the governing body was heavily biased towards Ulster. Most internationals were played in Belfast, most players selected were from the North-East. With the country moving politically towards partition, soccer in Ireland was arguably affected more by the political environment than any other sport. As tensions rose between unionist and nationalist communities, soccer, with strong support bases in both communities, became embroiled in the conflict, playing host to many ugly sectarian incidents.

Divisions in the sport reached a climax after the First World War, culminating in the split of 1921 when Leinster seceded from the IFA and formed the Football Association of Ireland (FAI).

Making use of extensive primary sources from the IFA, FAI, the English FA and the Leinster Football Association as well as contemporary newspaper sources, The Irish Soccer Split details the events and causes that led to the split in soccer in Ireland. It compares soccer to other sports that remained or became united after partition. The Irish Soccer Split recounts the early years of the FAI and its attempts to gain international recognition. Many efforts were made to heal the division throughout the 1920s and the early 1930s. Efforts were renewed during the Troubles in the 1970s and 1980s to bring about an all-Ireland international team. Some came very close, all ultimately failed, leaving soccer in Ireland today, as it is politically, divided North and South.

Ebook is available on Apple ibooks

Ebook is available on Amazon Kindle

Ebook is available on Amazon (USA) Kindle


Average Rating: 5 of 5 Total Reviews: 8 Write a review »

  1 of 1 people found the following review helpful:
 
The Irish Soccer Split January 7, 2016
Reviewer: Meath Chronicle from Ireland  
certainly well worth a read for anyone with an interest in the history of sport in Ireland or indeed the history of Ireland

Was this review helpful to you?

  1 of 1 people found the following review helpful:
 
The Irish Soccer Split December 16, 2015
Reviewer: Damien O'Meara - RTE 2fm's Game On from Ireland  
A brilliant history book

Was this review helpful to you?

  1 of 1 people found the following review helpful:
 
The Irish Soccer Split December 16, 2015
Reviewer: Dermot Bolger- The Irish Mail on Sunday from Ireland  
Sporting buffs wondering why our small island has two soccer teams in the Euros next summer will learn a great deal from this excellent book. It details the sectarianism and regional tensions which led to the split; the FAI's quest for international recognition and the sporting politics that ensure this rift never healed

Was this review helpful to you?

  1 of 1 people found the following review helpful:
 
The Irish Soccer Split December 16, 2015
Reviewer: Enda McEvoy-The Sunday Times from Ireland  
Moore's eye for detail enlivens the narrative, whether it's Winston Churchill addressing a Home Rule rally in Belfast in 1912, to the outrage of unionists; or the Northern Ireland team that reached the quarter-finals of the 1958 World Cup in Sweden being met in Malmo by a bus flying the tricolour. Moore is even-handed in his judgement

Was this review helpful to you?

  1 of 1 people found the following review helpful:
 
The Irish Soccer Split December 16, 2015
Reviewer: Alan Bairner-Sport in Society from UK  
Cormac Moore is...to be commended for unearthing a huge amount of evidence dating back to the years immediately before and after the emergence of two governing bodies for association football in Ireland and for providing new insights into the reasons which lay behind this development. This book allows readers to consider, with far greater information to hand than was previously available, whether 'the split'...was primarily caused by politics or status rivalries within the game or a combination of the two. Moore tells the story, in remarkable detail...I salute the author for producing such an authoritative piece of work. Thirty-seven pages of endnotes, the use of countless sources, both primary and secondary, and three informative appendices tell their own story

Was this review helpful to you?

View All Customer Reviews
 
Copyright ©  Cork University Press. All Rights Reserved.Built with Volusion